Apprenticeship Providers

Safeguarding for Apprenticeship Providers

Many apprenticeship providers do an excellent job of keeping their learners safe. Some do not. Ofsted published a report they had recently completed, looking at the work of an independent learning provider and illustrating the importance of getting safeguarding right. Key issues include:

  • DSLs without relevant training
  • apprentices lack of knowledge about radicalisation and the Prevent Duty
  • apprentices are not supported to feel safe in the workplace
  • managers are slow to deal with concerns raised by apprentices and staff

If you are an apprenticeship providers, or your learners attend one, the Ofsted report deserves as an important reminder.

(Although this report is in the public-domain, it is my policy to not identify organisations with poor practice, largely because they will hopefully improve and I wouldn’t want to keep material online when it may refer to a difficult inspection in the past.)

Download the Ofsted report here

Why do employers have to safeguard apprentices?

Any organisation educating young people under the age of 18 has statutory responsibilities under current legislation such as ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education’.

Apprentices need to be safeguarded against the same range of risks and dangers as their peers in schools and colleges. Due to their relative inexperience in the workplace apprentices may be particularly vulnerable to anxiety or struggle to cope with the transition. Systems can help staff recognise this and offer suitable support to those who need it. Organisations offering any kind of apprenticeship or traineeship to young people need to put processes in place to protect their learners.